Top 10 Best VST Plugins For FL Studio [The Image Line Collection]

Best FL Studio Plugins Featured Image

Lets talk about “The Best VST Plugins For FL Studio” which is hard to tell. True or not?

There are just too many to mention.

I can not really say which is the best for FL studio but I can tell you which are widely used and for what purpose.

It depends on what music you like and want to produce right?

If you purchase the complete version of FL Studio, you do not want to purchase something else for a while.

Best FL Studio Plugins Featured Image
Slice-X

Fruity Loops Studio Packs & Synths

SliceX Sampler

Slice-XWith a pricetag of $50, I'd say investing that in a drum loop slicing tool is a bit too farfetched.

But SliceX proves with features and usability it is worth its price.

While not too intuitive, if you've used a Dr. Rex loop player from Propellerhead, it looks similar with all its knobs and features.

However, SliceX is more than just the usual slice tool.

SliceX has:

  • a Master Panel up top
  • an Articulation Panel in the middle
  • a Wave Editor and...
  • a step-sequencer as the fourth layer of this interesting VST.

The Master Panel has the standard ADSR filter. The X/Y grid for modulation makes for some interesting effects. All of these can be automated, including everything in the articulation to the wave editor.

Perhaps one of the most useful things about SliceX is the ability to insert markers in the Wave Editor. Finding the slices you'd want to use on the fly is great for live performing DJs. Meanwhile, the articulation panel has impressive high-pass and band-pass filters.

Another useful feature is that each marker could introduce new articulation settings. If you're using SlicerX as your main tool, you won't need a separate sequencer too. This thing just rocks.

Slice-X
Sytrus

Sytrus

SytrusImageLine's Sytrus is an additive and subtractive synthesizer that eats up lots of ram and CPU power.

But in exchange is a plethora of great presets to get you started.

I don't think you're getting Sytrus and paying about $150 for the vst synthesizer just for those presets though.

If you dig around a little more, you'll find Sytrus is more of a feature-rich frequency modulation synthesizer.

Sytrus is powered by six oscillators in a series sequence perfect for frequency and ring modulation, as a start. The modulation matrix allows you to setup the output for the frequency modulation sequence. The interface is more intuitive than most subtractive synthesizers, being that you have a wavetable to get the sound you'd want to have.

On top of the wavetable is a partial harmonic editor matrix allowing you full control of your synth sound. Shape modifiers allow you to change:

  • the wave shape
  • the tension (which can deliver some awesome ring modulation)
  • skew
  • sine shaping
  • pre-filter and...
  • noise.

What makes Sytrus impressively versatile is the articulation section of each operator in the frequency modulation synthesis. The plucked damping (DAMP) articulation introduces some swift attack emulating a plucking sound with no clicking.

The huge modulation matrix is essential for creating unique frequency modulation sounds. Subtractive synthesizers often have limited features, but this one, especially the articulation and modulation table, really takes the cake.


Sytrus
Harmor Image

Harmor

Harmor ImageAggressive looking but feature-rich as much as Sytrus could do, Harmor had positive reviews from delighted users.

The plentiful knobs and its grayish color scheme comes with high quality sound and capabilities that make it a powerful contender in the additive synthesis category.

If you're not sold on creativity and synth canvases such as this one, let me tell you, the presets are impressive!

Harmor has the usual oscillator generator, a filtering section and the global section right underneath everything. Beside the global section is your most essential tool, the Envelope Window

But before we head to that, Harmor offers you a timbre of one sine and another waveform. Their waveforms are displayed in the envelope window and as per additive synth, you could edit them.

Tweak them with unique features such as changing the positions of partials via Prism and throwing harmonics everywhere through the Harmonizer.

Obviously, the Envelope Window, the Prism, Harmonizer and sub generator gets the cake for extending the usefulness of Harmor. But the pluck/attack editor and the filters that introduce some vintage and experimental filtering sound great and is useful during performances or recording.

The ability to automate the Envelope Window made Harmor a winner for me. The ability to change frequencies, change the filters, change the sine in real time makes for some experimental-level of synthesis. Welcome to the future indeed!

Harmor Image
Harmless Image

Harmless

Harmless ImageFor $80, you get an additive synthesizer that is easy to use. With lots of possibilities, ImageLine's Harmless is everything you need from a powerful additive synthesizer. Except it couldn't make those dirty TB-303 sounds.

The problem with additive synthesis is the impression of rocket science with all the algorithm. But this one introduces additive synthesis into a simpler form. Your $80 won't go to waste here!

The Timbre, as with Harmor, is where the sound generation begins. Choose your waveform and resynthesize. You could even drag your own samples. Harmless will analyze the waveforms of your sample ready for total alteration via additive synthesis

The Timbre sports a Custom function allowing you to add or cancel out sawtooth variants. While it has its own presets appearing as variations of sawtooth, creating new sounds has never been easier.

verything in Harmless is useful. From the Harmonic Equalizer that follows the bands depending on the waveform and note's pitch to the subtractive-esque filter section. Effects such as Phaser become useful if you want to cancel out frequencies through phase cancellation post sound-generation. Pretty interesting stuff.

Probably the most useful is indeed, the phaser. Adding and subtracting sawtooth values while creating new cancellation (or addition, Phase makes it possible too) in your sound makes Harmless interesting enough that you forget you need some Wub sounds from a dirtier-sounding synth.

Still, it holds well on its own.

Harmless Image
3xOsc Image
3xosc

3xOsc ImagePerhaps the 3xosc synthesizer is the easiest frequency modulation synthesis available today.

The best thing about it is that it's a free fl studio plugin that comes with the program...

All you have is a simple interface with three operators. While it might appear limiting for people who need to have more from their synthesizer, ImageLine's 3xosc is expandable. Don't be deceived by its appearance, or its hefty price tag.

Reading reviews, I've seen some claim they could make snares, trumpets and huge kicks out of the 3xosc. Let's see.

It's as simple as it gets. The 3xOsc features six waveform, a Custom waveform option and a waveform randomizer for interesting sounds. Next, you have a slider that sets the phase offsets for the left and right hcannels of the generator, allowing you to create huge pad sounds through frequency modulation. Detune allows you to create some heavier sub sounds.

Coarse Tuning, Fine Tuning, Panning, Volume, OSC3 AM and Phase Randomizer (Phase Rand), that's all you need to get some huge sounds.

Try this, switch Phase Randomizer on. You'd probably hear some clicks due to the phase changes happening at random with start points beginning almost everywhere. Fix it with short attack times and you get some pretty unique synthesizer sounds. But that's not the cherry on top though.

Use the custom waveform to combine unique-sounding waveforms via subtractive synth. This option allows you to use a simple frequency modulating synthesizer to achieve some new, interesting and useful sounds.

3xOsc Image
Editing and Recording Tool Edison

FL Mixing Effects

Edison

Editing and Recording Tool EdisonWill you be willing to pay $100 for a wave editor that works similar to your DAW but you don't have to call up the DAW in the first place (confused)?

Here's ImageLine's Edison, originally and imported from FL Studio to the outside world of VST technology.

With its standalone mode, you could make it work like SliceX. But it has automatic slicing using pitch detection, great-sounding time and pitch shifting and even blurring the transients of your audio. Wow.

Edison looks like a videogame turned into an instrument of pure creativity. It breaks down your audio into a waveform (duh). But when that happens, the audio has gone through spectral frequency analysis already.

You have a convolution reverb with impulse responses, an EQ, a denoiser (works very well like iZotope's RX series) de-click and fade functions.

Pretty good so far. but until you hear the cherry on top you'll want to read on.

The simple beat slicer with different sensitivity levels does a great job with sampling. However, the pitch detection automatic slicing has helped me save countless minutes in grabbing and exporting samples.

But I'd like to train myself in the Pascal programming language. It seems Edison gives you the ability to run scripts and create your functions with graphical interfaces. If I just focused on my Object Programming course in college, this VST is mind-blowing, at best.

Editing and Recording Tool Edison
Vocodex Image

Vocodex

Vocodex ImageI've seen lots of vocoders out there create some great harmonization and new flavor to already existing songs.

It's truly great technology for digital electronic artists and synth addicts.

Vocodex is simple enough to use with jus seven knobs, a wavetable and a gigantic knob for wet/dry mixing.

Each of those knobs include time stretching, formant, voice doubling and more.

Vocodex works by using a real-time voice frequency analysis resulting in a complete breakdown of your voice's tonal partials via waveform. The partial collected becomes the modulator to control the frequency band of another synthesized sound. Further down the rabbit hole are narrow-band frequency gates that filter out frequencies in the synthesized sound based on again, your voice.

It's actually using the synths of Sytrus, so there's no question about quality right here.

Vocodex has a modulator noise reduction for ambient sound/bleed blocking. As simple as such, it's highly efficient; no ideal situation for vocoder voice recording truly exists and you'll be dealing with high-frequency sounds at best.

Additional useful features include sidechain carrier and modulator input, voice doubling, and a built-in unison effect that I know you're going to have lots of use for.

Vocodex Image
Love Philter Image
Love Philter

Love Philter ImageYou have eight filter units combined together. The output of one could be fed to the next or you could let it go back into the channel.

You could solo each filter to see how they add up together when you try to develop your own sound. That's the objective of Fruity Love Philter.

The VST first appeared in Fruity Loops 7 and has gone on to FL10. Image Line released a standalone version to the glee of everyone interested.

The Love Philter's in channel options have an On or Solo option, both of which you already know the functions of. On the right you have the filters with low, high and band pass options. You also have envelope, cutoff and resonance controls right below. Above these are the parameters for the ALT function.

The ALT function alternates between resonance and bandwith. You get the standard switches for 12, 24 and 36 dB octave filters or you could have some fun with two additional settings that play with the 24/36 dB filter modes.

You also have a WaveShaper with a Uniploar mode that allows you to edit waveforms as you go.

Clearly enough, anybody would say the WaveShaper is the most useful feature of this tool. You might just be correct. But I'd have to say it's the eight filters that are the best tools in this VST.

Having eight filters with the ability to copy-paste settings into other oscillators for intricate and fine-tuned adjustments to create that unique sound is where it really counts!

Love Philter Image
Maxmimus Image
Maxmimus

Maxmimus ImageIf you ever needed a mixing and mastering tool that's simple to use with multiple features for mastering, then Image Line's Maxmimus is everything you'll need.

Let's do away with those slightly-confusing Waves comps and even IKM's own set of high-quality compressors for something simple made up of lines and colors.

My only qualm about this effective tool? The limited number of bands available!

Maximimus offers the same low-mid-high frequency bands we've seen in other multiband compressors. Look-aheads, we've also seen that. Four individual compressor and a master band equalizer? We've also seen those

But we haven't seen anything that uses curves. This one does, and each curve is a fixed attribution to a ratio in traditional multiband compressors. The fun thing is, you could shape this curve to your will.

That makes for some great dynamic manipulation!

This is Maxmimus' most useful feature, especially for those who are thoroughly confused with ratio settings on traditional compressors.

What's more, you don't only have one curve (traditional single band compressor). You could add plenty of control points to edit the sound dynamics as much as you could. Join the control points and create new dynamic horizons! Whoa!

Maxmimus Image
GrossBeat Image

Grossbeat

GrossBeat ImageTime manipulation should go beyond vocal correction during the post-processing process.

Many DJs and electronic artists have tried their hand with traditional time manipulation tools to create awesome glitch, repeat, scratching and stutter performances.

Some even went through the DAW slip-edit phase to reach such ends.

Now, we've got computer technology and Grossbeat is the best when it comes to glitch and stutter performances!

Grossbeat features a click reduction option. Given that your settings would travel and play audio with different volumes, clicks are abound. This is plenty useful. Smooth attack compensation allows you to preserve transients during fadeouts from envelopes.

HQ resampling is notable for preserving audio quality throughout a massive time stretch or pitch shift. However, it's going to cost some CPU load so be careful.

A scratching clock allows you to perform some turntable scratches. This can be automated, making it one of the best features of this VST ever without the use of a turntable!

I wouldn't recommend using Grossbeat during live performances though. Unless you're using a touchscreen computer or a powerful external controller, you could use all the options as you would a DJ board.

However, these are some useful high-quality time manipulation devices that I have to admit, is really appalling if used effectively!

If your looking for an fl studio 12 free download click on it. Remember that it's just a trial/demo version.

GrossBeat Image

PREV NEXT

Some Of The Best VST Plugins From Image-Line

Lets talk about “The Best VST Plugins For FL Studio” which is hard to tell. True or not?

There are just too many to mention.

I can not really say which is the best for FL studio but I can tell you which are widely used and for what purpose.

It depends on what music you like and want to produce right?

If you purchase the complete version of FL Studio, you do not want to purchase something else for a while.

 


Fruity Loops Studio Packs & Synths

SliceX Sampler

Slice-XWith a pricetag of $50, I’d say investing that in a drum loop slicing tool is a bit too farfetched.

But SliceX proves with features and usability it is worth its price.

While not too intuitive, if you’ve used a Dr. Rex loop player from Propellerhead, it looks similar with all its knobs and features.

However, SliceX is more than just the usual slice tool.

SliceX has:

  • a Master Panel up top
  • an Articulation Panel in the middle
  • a Wave Editor and…
  • a step-sequencer as the fourth layer of this interesting VST.

The Master Panel has the standard ADSR filter. The X/Y grid for modulation makes for some interesting effects. All of these can be automated, including everything in the articulation to the wave editor.

Perhaps one of the most useful things about SliceX is the ability to insert markers in the Wave Editor. Finding the slices you’d want to use on the fly is great for live performing DJs. Meanwhile, the articulation panel has impressive high-pass and band-pass filters.

Another useful feature is that each marker could introduce new articulation settings. If you’re using SlicerX as your main tool, you won’t need a separate sequencer too. This thing just rocks.


Sytrus

SytrusImageLine’s Sytrus is an additive and subtractive synthesizer that eats up lots of ram and CPU power.

But in exchange is a plethora of great presets to get you started.

I don’t think you’re getting Sytrus and paying about $150 for the vst synthesizer just for those presets though.

If you dig around a little more, you’ll find Sytrus is more of a feature-rich frequency modulation synthesizer.

Sytrus is powered by six oscillators in a series sequence perfect for frequency and ring modulation, as a start. The modulation matrix allows you to setup the output for the frequency modulation sequence. The interface is more intuitive than most subtractive synthesizers, being that you have a wavetable to get the sound you’d want to have.

On top of the wavetable is a partial harmonic editor matrix allowing you full control of your synth sound. Shape modifiers allow you to change:

  • the wave shape
  • the tension (which can deliver some awesome ring modulation)
  • skew
  • sine shaping
  • pre-filter and…
  • noise.

What makes Sytrus impressively versatile is the articulation section of each operator in the frequency modulation synthesis. The plucked damping (DAMP) articulation introduces some swift attack emulating a plucking sound with no clicking.

The huge modulation matrix is essential for creating unique frequency modulation sounds. Subtractive synthesizers often have limited features, but this one, especially the articulation and modulation table, really takes the cake.


Harmor

Harmor ImageAggressive looking but feature-rich as much as Sytrus could do, Harmor had positive reviews from delighted users.

The plentiful knobs and its grayish color scheme comes with high quality sound and capabilities that make it a powerful contender in the additive synthesis category.

If you’re not sold on creativity and synth canvases such as this one, let me tell you, the presets are impressive!

Harmor has the usual oscillator generator, a filtering section and the global section right underneath everything. Beside the global section is your most essential tool, the Envelope Window

But before we head to that, Harmor offers you a timbre of one sine and another waveform. Their waveforms are displayed in the envelope window and as per additive synth, you could edit them.

Tweak them with unique features such as changing the positions of partials via Prism and throwing harmonics everywhere through the Harmonizer.

Obviously, the Envelope Window, the Prism, Harmonizer and sub generator gets the cake for extending the usefulness of Harmor. But the pluck/attack editor and the filters that introduce some vintage and experimental filtering sound great and is useful during performances or recording.

The ability to automate the Envelope Window made Harmor a winner for me. The ability to change frequencies, change the filters, change the sine in real time makes for some experimental-level of synthesis. Welcome to the future indeed!

Harmless

Harmless ImageFor $80, you get an additive synthesizer that is easy to use. With lots of possibilities, ImageLine’s Harmless is everything you need from a powerful additive synthesizer. Except it couldn’t make those dirty TB-303 sounds.

The problem with additive synthesis is the impression of rocket science with all the algorithm. But this one introduces additive synthesis into a simpler form. Your $80 won’t go to waste here!

The Timbre, as with Harmor, is where the sound generation begins. Choose your waveform and resynthesize. You could even drag your own samples. Harmless will analyze the waveforms of your sample ready for total alteration via additive synthesis

The Timbre sports a Custom function allowing you to add or cancel out sawtooth variants. While it has its own presets appearing as variations of sawtooth, creating new sounds has never been easier.

verything in Harmless is useful. From the Harmonic Equalizer that follows the bands depending on the waveform and note’s pitch to the subtractive-esque filter section. Effects such as Phaser become useful if you want to cancel out frequencies through phase cancellation post sound-generation. Pretty interesting stuff.

Probably the most useful is indeed, the phaser. Adding and subtracting sawtooth values while creating new cancellation (or addition, Phase makes it possible too) in your sound makes Harmless interesting enough that you forget you need some Wub sounds from a dirtier-sounding synth.

Still, it holds well on its own.

3xosc

3xOsc ImagePerhaps the 3xosc synthesizer is the easiest frequency modulation synthesis available today.

The best thing about it is that it’s a free fl studio plugin that comes with the program…

All you have is a simple interface with three operators. While it might appear limiting for people who need to have more from their synthesizer, ImageLine’s 3xosc is expandable. Don’t be deceived by its appearance, or its hefty price tag.

Reading reviews, I’ve seen some claim they could make snares, trumpets and huge kicks out of the 3xosc. Let’s see.

It’s as simple as it gets. The 3xOsc features six waveform, a Custom waveform option and a waveform randomizer for interesting sounds. Next, you have a slider that sets the phase offsets for the left and right hcannels of the generator, allowing you to create huge pad sounds through frequency modulation. Detune allows you to create some heavier sub sounds.

Coarse Tuning, Fine Tuning, Panning, Volume, OSC3 AM and Phase Randomizer (Phase Rand), that’s all you need to get some huge sounds.

Try this, switch Phase Randomizer on. You’d probably hear some clicks due to the phase changes happening at random with start points beginning almost everywhere. Fix it with short attack times and you get some pretty unique synthesizer sounds. But that’s not the cherry on top though.

Use the custom waveform to combine unique-sounding waveforms via subtractive synth. This option allows you to use a simple frequency modulating synthesizer to achieve some new, interesting and useful sounds.

FL Mixing Effects

Edison

Editing and Recording Tool EdisonWill you be willing to pay $100 for a wave editor that works similar to your DAW but you don’t have to call up the DAW in the first place (confused)?

Here’s ImageLine’s Edison, originally and imported from FL Studio to the outside world of VST technology.

With its standalone mode, you could make it work like SliceX. But it has automatic slicing using pitch detection, great-sounding time and pitch shifting and even blurring the transients of your audio. Wow.

Edison looks like a videogame turned into an instrument of pure creativity. It breaks down your audio into a waveform (duh). But when that happens, the audio has gone through spectral frequency analysis already.

You have a convolution reverb with impulse responses, an EQ, a denoiser (works very well like iZotope’s RX series) de-click and fade functions.

Pretty good so far. but until you hear the cherry on top you’ll want to read on.

The simple beat slicer with different sensitivity levels does a great job with sampling. However, the pitch detection automatic slicing has helped me save countless minutes in grabbing and exporting samples.

But I’d like to train myself in the Pascal programming language. It seems Edison gives you the ability to run scripts and create your functions with graphical interfaces. If I just focused on my Object Programming course in college, this VST is mind-blowing, at best.

Vocodex

Vocodex ImageI’ve seen lots of vocoders out there create some great harmonization and new flavor to already existing songs.

It’s truly great technology for digital electronic artists and synth addicts.

Vocodex is simple enough to use with jus seven knobs, a wavetable and a gigantic knob for wet/dry mixing.

Each of those knobs include time stretching, formant, voice doubling and more.

Vocodex works by using a real-time voice frequency analysis resulting in a complete breakdown of your voice’s tonal partials via waveform. The partial collected becomes the modulator to control the frequency band of another synthesized sound. Further down the rabbit hole are narrow-band frequency gates that filter out frequencies in the synthesized sound based on again, your voice.

It’s actually using the synths of Sytrus, so there’s no question about quality right here.

Vocodex has a modulator noise reduction for ambient sound/bleed blocking. As simple as such, it’s highly efficient; no ideal situation for vocoder voice recording truly exists and you’ll be dealing with high-frequency sounds at best.

Additional useful features include sidechain carrier and modulator input, voice doubling, and a built-in unison effect that I know you’re going to have lots of use for.

Love Philter

Love Philter ImageYou have eight filter units combined together. The output of one could be fed to the next or you could let it go back into the channel.

You could solo each filter to see how they add up together when you try to develop your own sound. That’s the objective of Fruity Love Philter.

The VST first appeared in Fruity Loops 7 and has gone on to FL10. Image Line released a standalone version to the glee of everyone interested.

The Love Philter’s in channel options have an On or Solo option, both of which you already know the functions of. On the right you have the filters with low, high and band pass options. You also have envelope, cutoff and resonance controls right below. Above these are the parameters for the ALT function.

The ALT function alternates between resonance and bandwith. You get the standard switches for 12, 24 and 36 dB octave filters or you could have some fun with two additional settings that play with the 24/36 dB filter modes.

You also have a WaveShaper with a Uniploar mode that allows you to edit waveforms as you go.

Clearly enough, anybody would say the WaveShaper is the most useful feature of this tool. You might just be correct. But I’d have to say it’s the eight filters that are the best tools in this VST.

Having eight filters with the ability to copy-paste settings into other oscillators for intricate and fine-tuned adjustments to create that unique sound is where it really counts!

Maxmimus

Maxmimus ImageIf you ever needed a mixing and mastering tool that’s simple to use with multiple features for mastering, then Image Line’s Maxmimus is everything you’ll need.

Let’s do away with those slightly-confusing Waves comps and even IKM’s own set of high-quality compressors for something simple made up of lines and colors.

My only qualm about this effective tool? The limited number of bands available!

Maximimus offers the same low-mid-high frequency bands we’ve seen in other multiband compressors. Look-aheads, we’ve also seen that. Four individual compressor and a master band equalizer? We’ve also seen those

But we haven’t seen anything that uses curves. This one does, and each curve is a fixed attribution to a ratio in traditional multiband compressors. The fun thing is, you could shape this curve to your will.

That makes for some great dynamic manipulation!

This is Maxmimus’ most useful feature, especially for those who are thoroughly confused with ratio settings on traditional compressors.

What’s more, you don’t only have one curve (traditional single band compressor). You could add plenty of control points to edit the sound dynamics as much as you could. Join the control points and create new dynamic horizons! Whoa!

Grossbeat

GrossBeat ImageTime manipulation should go beyond vocal correction during the post-processing process.

Many DJs and electronic artists have tried their hand with traditional time manipulation tools to create awesome glitch, repeat, scratching and stutter performances.

Some even went through the DAW slip-edit phase to reach such ends.

Now, we’ve got computer technology and Grossbeat is the best when it comes to glitch and stutter performances!

Grossbeat features a click reduction option. Given that your settings would travel and play audio with different volumes, clicks are abound. This is plenty useful. Smooth attack compensation allows you to preserve transients during fadeouts from envelopes.

HQ resampling is notable for preserving audio quality throughout a massive time stretch or pitch shift. However, it’s going to cost some CPU load so be careful.

A scratching clock allows you to perform some turntable scratches. This can be automated, making it one of the best features of this VST ever without the use of a turntable!

I wouldn’t recommend using Grossbeat during live performances though. Unless you’re using a touchscreen computer or a powerful external controller, you could use all the options as you would a DJ board.

However, these are some useful high-quality time manipulation devices that I have to admit, is really appalling if used effectively!

If your looking for an fl studio 12 free download click on it. Remember that it’s just a trial/demo version.


The effects that are in it are doing the work as perfect as any other DAW (Digital Audio Workstation). The only thing you’ll have to purchase in the future, whether you have to pay for it or not are good Synths and drum VST’s.

Nevertheless this DAW does much more than most DAWs when you’re talking about manipulating sounds.

If you are looking for external plugins from other manufacturers besides you should check our catalog of vst’s


When you practice with the plugins you already have then I wouldn’t be picky with VST’s plugins you want to buy and want to add to your collection.

You often think with your eyes but put a magnifying glass on and take a look what you already have and you will be amazed what Image Line fl studio vst plugins has to offer.

So you’ll see, it’s more than you think you know…

I’m still amazed to this very day what I can do to tweak sounds with FL. I can give you a tip for when you just start making music. Take a package of fat sounds and stick with it for a while.

With to many vst’s and patches you can’ t see any threes through the forest. This way, you’re just listening to sounds instead of spending your time with producing.

Do you want something that does it all, then I would advise you to purchase NI Komplete. It will cost you some but you will get real professional sounding instruments and effects.

I can tell you, this package has just about everything you need. I just lift out a few because there are just too many to discuss. I will talk about them later on other pages.

So what are your favorite Fl plugins? Whats your opinion about all of this? Let me know with a Comment and Share it with the world..haha

PREV

Must Have Waves Plugin Bundle: They’re a Standard, But It Depends on Your Taste.

Best Waves VST PluginsWhenever you meet another music producer, plugins are probably a routine conversation.

Part of that routine sentence you just said were the words “waves plugins” (and Izotope comes second).

Honestly, I’m a big fan of Waves. There are no artifacts when it comes to adding equalization.

There’s great warmth and character in their audio saturation.

It’s like you have a rack of analog effects right inside your laptop that you just carry around by hand.

So lets start by checking out the….



1. The API 2500 and API 560

Dynamics Processor API 2500

API 2500

Waves have gone through lengths to emulate some classic rack sounds from the 1960s. The Waves API 2500 and API 560, created in association with API itself, are respectively a stereo compressor and a graphic equalizer.

The API 2500 allows you to shape the transient’s arrival in your mix, which then contributes to highly accurate tone design for instruments and mixes. It has it’s distinct vintage sound.

API 560 10-Band Graphic Equalizer

The API 560 is a vintage EQ plugin produced by API in 1967 which gave accurate frequency filtering and very high headroom. It has enabled effective signal enhancement and room tuning. With a 12 db of boost/cut per band and extreme Q narrowing for your tracks you’d definitely shape something that has character and accuracy at the same time.

Check also this Full Review About The API 2500 Compressor[/read]


2. L1 and L2 Ultramaximizers

Peak Limiter Plugin Ultramaximizer L1

Peak Limiter Plugin Ultramaximizer L1

Ultramaximizers is definitely the term I would use for Waves’ L1 and L2 Ultramaximizers. As a brick-wall limiter, no audio signal passes through it.[read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

Setting the attack at a fast speed actually introduces less unnatural nuances than other compressor plugins out there. The sensitivity of the ultramaximizers is a must whether for electronic dance music or soft country music.

Waves L2 peak limiter Ultramaximizer

When I was mixing a metal band, I wanted the harsh vocals to sound like it really meant business. So I pulled down the threshold a bit further and gave it just enough release time. If you’re familiar with that odd-time rich genre of metal called “djent” it gives it a punchy vocal feel if you could use it right.[/read]


3. The L3 Multimaximizer

L3 Multimaximizer All In One Plugin For Mastering

L3 Multimaximizer All In One Plugin For Mastering

What made the L1 ultramaximizer special and the L2 greatly distinct is because they function so great as a combination.[read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

However, combining a multi-band and equalization featured topped with linear-phase crossovers to ensure you’re still getting your original signal.

It’s lovely interface makes it all the more useful for any music producer. You can take it all in and still achieve a great sound due to the plugin’s Peak Limiting Mixer. I have tried in several projects and I could say my work was twice faster and more efficient.

Read more about: The L3 Multimaximizer Review[/read]


4. The Scheps 73

3-band EQ Andrew Scheps 73

3-band EQ Andrew Scheps 73

Waves has a penchant for re-creating classic on-board mixers and the Neve 1073 was an eye on their list. This vintage EQ is something that’s special.[read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

In my experience, it could handle individual instrument tracks, including vocals, without much trouble. It could also handle boomy low ends from drum busses. The most notable about it, as with other vintage racks, is that it could tame wild low ends without removing the overall quality.

With an M/S option, I was able to lower some low-mids and bass from the middle channel alone and upgrade the highs on my stereo end of the deal.

I found it awesome when I was needing some sort of character for a piano track I was mixing. The piano sounded as tame as it does in a live performance. However, in pop music, you want some notes to really stand out. I added some frequencies on the higher registers and poof, I got what I was looking for.

Read More About: The Scheps 73[/read]


5. H-Delay Analog Delay

Get Oldskool Effects With the H-Delay Hybrid Delay

Get Oldskool Effects With the H-Delay Hybrid Delay

Vintage delays are everything you’ll need to get that vintage tone. Of course, these delays should have good phasing, organic flanging and very good slap-back on echo.[read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

The best part about the H-Delay Analog Delay from Waves is that have up to 3,500 ms delay time, variable pitch delay time behavior (that lovely zinging you could hear from vintage guitar and synth tracks) and even LFO pitch modulation.

Analog delays are my guilty pleasure. I’d love to hear them bounce around my left and right ears when I do a mix. H-Delay’s added pitch epicness just gives me more ideas on how to make unique stereo sounds for any instrument.[/read]


6. MaxxBass

Get your Lows Done With Maxxbass

Get your Lows Done With Maxxbass

MaxxBass is one unique bass enhancement plugin because it analyzes your signal’s bass end. So for recording bass guitars or bass-y instruments, this is a must.[read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

It could be compared to Izotope’s analysis algorithms, but waves takes it further by adding harmonics at a higher octave. It then attenuates the frequency carefully not to lose the bass power while taming it down just enough to make it sit well in a mix.

Rolling back the bass a few dBs never hurt a mix, ever, and this plugin is what you’ll need for that.

This plugin is ideal if you’re recording with a rock band or mixing a loud EDM track. The bass flies around all over the place with these genres. To ensure the tight grip on my bass, I attenuate just enough to remove the boom from the kick drum and give it the definition it deserves.[/read]


7. Renaissance Compressor

Classic Warm Renaissance Compressor

Classic Warm Renaissance Compressor

Every audio engineer’s nightmare is a compressor that kills all the dynamics. Fortunately, Waves created something that delivers natural and fluid tube compression.[read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

Featuring an easy-to-use interface and powerful brickwall limiting without destroying the transients of a mix, this is a compressor for every genre. It has its own character, by the way, when you place the attack at a very low response time.

Sometimes, I use the Renaissance Compressor as a substitute for my existing limiters. In some genres, such as mixed genres that change dynamics instantly, you need something that could maintain the loudness of the mix and dynamics without actually hurting the dynamics in the process.

It’s a great way to bring out the lushness in a mix before you really knock it out of the park with a master maximizer.[/read]


8. REDD

Abbey Roads REDD Consoles

Abbey Roads REDD Consoles

Abbey Road Studios in your laptop? No, I’m not kidding you. However, this might not work for everyone, especially those trying to create some futuristic sounds from electronic dance music. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

It emulates individual mixer channels from the famous REDD desk In Abbey Road Studios. Turn up the drive on your REDD console and you could feel a bit of dirt that’s enough to send some organic thickness into your tracks. Heavy metal engineers I know use this to drive their drums and bass to punchy oblivion.

This is ideal if you find your original kick instrument is lacking in definition and punch. Compressors could work, but you would definitely have some artifacts left. The REDD helps remove some of the low end and boost the low-mid to mid range of the kick tracks.

After using REDD, you could style your transient effectively and use a compressor to make it stand out with a more defined and natural character.[/read]


9. Vitamin Sonic Enhancer

Multiband Harmonic Vitamin Sonic Enhancer For Mixing And Mastering

Vitamin Sonic Enhance

As the name implies, it provides the essential nutrients for any starving track. Track to thin? Have a go with it using some parallel multiband enhancers. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”] [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”][/read]

You could also control the studio width and create some great punch control to accentuate dynamics.

The best part about this plugin in my experience is the crossover frequency throughout each band. It helps create a genuine studio atmosphere in my opinion.

I usually use the Vitamin Sonic Enhancer whenever I have no time to re-track guitar tracks. Sometimes, the microphone is a bit off from the cabinet. It just needs a little reduction in certain frequencies, them slowly harmonically-enriching them using this plugin. Try it, it works for me!

Waves Vitamin Sonic Enhancer Review[/read]


10. PuigTec EQP-1A and Meq 5

Jack Joseph PuigTec EQP-1A

Jack Joseph PuigTec EQP-1A

Waves’ emulation of PuigTec’s EQP-1A is golden. It’s precise cut and boost helps in fattening up some of the thinnest guitar tracks I know. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

For example, if you recorded a guitar and you don’t like the microphone position, you could improve it by upping some parts on the 100HZ and 3Khz.

Meanwhile, the Meq 5 adds some magical harmonics (which I couldn’t explain, hear it for yourself) whenever you boost certain parts of your midrange. Definitely the duo to use when improving guitar sounds.

Midrange PuigTec Meq-5

Read more about: Puigtec MEQ-5 Review[/read]


11. Noise Suppressor NS1

Noise Suppressor NS1

Noise Suppressor NS1

We’re never fond of guitar hum noise, or the additional buzz of acoustic instruments and VST drums when we want a tight mix, specifically for electronic dance music. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

Unfortunately, many noise suppressors in the market today just introduce some sort of tone suck either from bad noise thresholds to signal attenuation.

The Waves Noise Suppressor works well for me because it’s easy to read the graphic display, it suggests the peak areas where the noise could be attenuated and you could even mute out some frequencies in certain parts. How about that?[/read]


12. Reel ADT

Abbey Road Studios Reel ADT

Abbey Road Studios Reel ADT

Double tracking is troublesome especially for guitarists. Not every performance is the same. However, Waves’ Reel ADT is something else. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

It enables you to remove phasing from two different tracks, but you could actually record a single track and use delays to make it seem like a double-shot track instantly. Set it up properly and you could even get a flanging effect. Reel ADT is also part of Waves’ emulation of Abbey Road Studio equipment.

Reel ADT is something helpful that saves time in a studio. Even acoustic instrument players will need some double tracking, especially if they have no other accompaniment.

However, an acoustic performance is relatively difficult than electric guitar performances, and sometimes, it contains lots of improvisations. Reel ADT helps resolve these problems without spending an hour or so in retakes.[/read]


13. Aphex Vintage Aural Exciter

Get Distinctive Sounds with Aphex Vintage Aural Exciter

Aphex Vintage Aural Exciter

When I first tried this plugin, I didn’t really like the result. It was a bit thin, smushy and all over the place. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

After I while, I spent some time studying its inner workings, and eventually found that its tube exciter qualities are actually useful if you use it in bass-y tracks. For example, if your drums sound a bit boomy, run it through the plugin, and you’ll get a pretty good tamed version of your drum sound.

Just collect the transient through a compressor and add some EQ and voila, you have a very distinct instrument sound.[/read]


14. TrueVerb

TrueVerb

True Verb

Early reflection is crucial if you want to create a warm entrance for a pad synth. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

You could create dimensions through space and time with this one. I was once using a canned explosion effect and I really needed it to have a huge dimension.

TrueVerb managed to expand that with some adjustments through its time and delay options. I actually made some snares to be like large whales too![/read]


15. Center

Get Final Mix Done With Center

Center

During your final track mastering, sometimes you wish you had mixed the vocals louder, or you just wanted to make the drums roomier, especially when you’re using triggers or some tight kick samples. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

Waves’ center solved my problem by helping boost the center of my track without affecting the other frequencies.

If you’re recording a single track with a great many microphones, you could combine them into one without phase problems using this plugin![/read]


16. Vocal Rider

Keep Levels Steady With Vocal Rider

Vocal Rider

As its name implies, it works to maintain the vocal dynamics instead of killing it with a single loud compressor. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

The surest way to deliver a vocal track in a mix is often through the use of a high ratio compressor, but in reality, you just want it to be as it is without tiring the listener’s ears.

The Vocal Rider works like a live setup rig; somebody messes with the knob accurately depending on the loudness of the entire band. Not advisable for vocal mastering, though.[/read]


17. MetaFlanger

Vintage Tape Metaflanger

Meta Flanger

Tape flanging is very warm and very attractive, and you want your jet sweeps flawless as you intend it to. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

Ideally, I use this for my vocal tracks whenever I need some thickness by using softer settings on speed and depth. Meanwhile, you could actually get cool guitar flanging sounds at extreme settings.

Now, there are cheaper alternatives to the MetaFlanger, but if you hear how this thing goes on chorus, you might reconsider purchasing it.[/read]


18. SSL G-Master Buss Compressor

The Waves SSL G-Master Buss Compressor

SSL G-Master Buss Compressor

You could always pull out your favorite compressor and run it as an insert in a bus. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

However, if you’ve heard how the SSL G-Master actually sounded in real life based on its IC input and twin gain-reduction, it creates a natural blend of compression that gets those pesky drum busses to work together.

It’s compression effect also adds some additional dynamics for your drums and bass.[/read]


19. GEQ Graphic Equalizer

GEQ Graphic Equalizer

GEQ Graphic Equalizer

The daddy of all EQs, wave’s GEQ resembles that large EQ rack you see during live events.This is great especially if you want to have a precise frequency reduction in your spectrum without altering the other frequencies too greatly. [read more=”Read more…” less=”Read less”]

It’s precise Q filters eliminate any artifacts and achieve the perfect “plateau” you could see in your tracks. Just imagine what you could do with it with some automation.

Of course, nothing beats the real thing. Maybe it’s just because Waves is a standard. I have heard special-sounding plugins for EQ and saturation during my time in working on and mastering audio, but the Waves plugins bundles are a great start for anybody entering the realm of music production.[/read]